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Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Day Night Shade Repair (Part One)

It was bound to happen, one of my day night shades broke a string.  I can’t complain, it lasted seven years.  I had repaired day night shades on my last motorhome about ten years ago, so I decided to tackle this repair myself.  It is not hard, just time consuming and a second pair of hands is a definite help.

I bought a repair kit at Camping World, about $12.  It comes with everything you need to effect the repair.

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The shade is held in the valance by a screw on each end and a plastic clip in the middle.  Remove the screws and then using a screwdriver, open the clip to remove the shade.  At the bottom of the shade on each side is a little round plastic tension spool with string on it, held in place by a screw.  Remove the screws to free both spools.

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I put the shade on my portable table to work on it.

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First off, clip the string off the tension spools.

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Pop off the end caps from the bottom rail of the shade.

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Slide the bottom rail off.

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Next remove the end caps from the center rail and the top rail. 

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Cut and remove all the string and discard it.

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My shade was not installed right, one of the mounting screws was screwed through the side of the top rail making it difficult to slide the rail off the fabric.

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I had to trim the hole with some cutting pliers to remove metal that was hanging up the rail.  Once I cut it away, I was able to slide the rail off.

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Once that was finished, I slid the bottom fabric clear of the middle rail

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Now that everything is taken apart, it was time to inspect the plastic grommets that are located on all the rails.  Most were pretty worn and one was never installed, just a hole with rough metal edges.  Amazing that the string lasted as long as it did.

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I removed all the old grommets and installed new ones using needle nose pliers.

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Part Two will be on the reassembly if the shade.  I know you’re on the edge of your seat to see if I can really do it.  :c)

Thanks for visiting and feel free to leave a comment.

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20 comments:

  1. I think I'd rather just replace them with mini-blinds.

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  2. can't wait for part two!!!

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  3. Not done it yet by ourselves but now we don't have to as long as we know where to find you. Now that you're experienced maybe Marti can rent you out to repair other shades.

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  4. David has done this on two or three of ours. If we could have made it to Akron you guys could have made a party out of it. He's gotten really good at it. :-)

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  5. I HATE HATE HATE those things anyway..when they go, new mini blinds are going in. But you're a brave soul for doing it.

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  6. Think you might have found a new workcamping gig for when you aren't busy with your favorite gig...PIN HUNTING;o)))

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  7. I am with Gayle. The cellular shades at Lowes even clip right in to the spot without more hardware. They cut them to the right length you pop them right up. I know- "what's the challenge in that?"

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  8. I only have a few day/night shades left in the rig. I've replaced the big windows with MCD shades. I'm hoping the ones I have left hold on until our paths cross again. :)

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  9. I have done all 6 of ours over the years and repaired quite a few for other rv'ers. Not hard but just takes you time and will be good as new. I found a fabric store that sold just the cord so picked up 100 yards of it always have some on hand. I used our bed as a worktable.
    Have fun.

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  10. I'm sure at some point ours will break too. We try to be very careful when raising or lowering them, one at a time to make them last awhile longer. I'm thinking that repairing those blinds could be
    a real fun job :)

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  11. NIce job of detailing the process Paul. We're so glad that we don't have those type of shades anymore. We had them in previous rigs and I believe at least one had broken in each rig we owned.

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  12. Had to do four them on the last rig, luckily the new one has MCD shades. Looking at those pictures brings back not so fond memories:)

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  13. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  14. Great pics and instructions on how to fix those shades. BUT, the pic I really wanted to see was your foot smashing the glass screen of your laptop! Maybe you could put that in the next exciting installment of "Stringin' Shades"!

    Rick’s Bits ‘n Bytes, Pics and News

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  15. Our Winnebago had the day / night shades....I hated them. The Tiffin has blinds....Don't like these either. I am really considering makig my own Roman Shades. Have the materials for the bathroom. Will see how that goes prior to committing.

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  16. We paid a guy $30 each for a guy to redo ours in the Coachmen... I think I like miniblinds and the MCD roller shades now better.
    ~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
    Karen and Steve
    (Blog) RVing: The USA Is Our Big Backyard
    http://kareninthewoods-kareninthewoods.blogspot.com
    ~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

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  17. We hated those shades and have a cat that loved to chew on the strings till they were no more. Well they are really gone now, we got MCD shades and really like them.

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  18. i use 50 pound test fishing monofiliment line... smoother up and downs and no fraying...

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  19. We had one fixed just last year. Here we could have had you do it.

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