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Monday, September 8, 2014

Changing The Journey’s Diaper

Well, the Journey doesn’t really wear a diaper, but the black tank valve was leaking.  I made the temporary fix using the external twist on valve but I wanted to repair the black tank valve correctly with a new valve. 

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It’s not a pleasant job working on the Journey’s sewer system, but I had to liken it to changing a baby’s diaper.  Heavens knows I’ve changed my fair share raising three kids and helping out on an occasional grandkid’s diaper change.

Still, I did do a serious flush of the black tank with the Journey’s installed flush system.

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I decided to replace both the black and grey tank valves at the same time.  Closer inspection showed the rubber pipe connections were cracking, so I bought two new ones to install at the same time.

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I used a marker to mark where the rubber connectors fit so I’d get the new ones back in the same place.

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I took out the four bolts one each of the two valves,

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and removed the hose clamps from the rubber hoses.  You can really see how badly they were cracked.

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Then I pulled the valves out and the seals (one on each side of the valve).

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Inspecting the black tank valve seals, I found where the seal had torn from seven years of use.  I think I got my monies worth.

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Lastly, I removed the cracked hoses.

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I used some silicone spray on the inside of the new hoses to help them slip on.

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Slipped the new hoses on, leaving the hose clamps loose,

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then put the two seals in place.

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Once the seals were in place, I slid the new valve in and installed the new bolts (finger tight).

                IMG_4932

After both the new black and grey tank valves were in place and everything was lined up where it should be, I went around and tightened the bolts and the hose clamps.  It’s best to tighten the bolts a little bit at a time, and tighten one, the on to the next one diagonally across.  This draws everything down evenly and ensures the valves and seals will seat correctly.

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Finally, the “Acid Test”.  I put a bunch of water in both tanks and checked for leaks.  None were found, so I declared the diaper change a success!  :c)

                   IMG_4936

I’d rate this as an easy job, even for a beginner.  It took about an hour (including putting away the tools).  A screwdriver, two 7/16” wrenches and a couple of rags are all that are needed.

Now I have peace of mind that there won’t be any more leaky “diapers”!  :c)

Thanks for visiting and feel free to leave a comment.

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14 comments:

  1. Well, I sure hope that you have the Journey potty trained now.

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  2. Would you come change the Monaco's diapers?

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  3. I changed Sherman's diapers a couple of years ago. Yep, easy enough job...but not what I'd call enjoyable! Just a hint...liberally spray some more of that silicon into the valve every now and again, as well as on the handle rod. Keeps the whole system operating smoothly. :-)

    www.travelwithkevinandruth.com

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  4. Yup. Rick did that "operation" on Lucy this past Spring. He reports that it wasn't difficult but it sure was a crappy job :)

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  5. Did you wear your Ed Norton hat for this job?

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  6. Great repair job.
    Wish ours was that easy to get at, They still working great after15 years and cannot even see where they are located.

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  7. Don't be getting rid of the twist on valve. You never know when S@#t happens.
    Be Safe and Enjoy!

    It's about time.

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  8. That would be a really big diaper. I'm still stuck on the mental image.

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  9. Stealing Gail' s line...tis a crappy job, but somebody's got to do it :)

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  10. Interesting to see the rubber connectors on each side of the valves. The solid piping from the tanks run right up to the sliding valves on our rig.
    Good job Paul. That job seems to be right up your alley. LOL

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  11. What a blog title. I too was stuck with a mental image of the journey wearing a diaper. David won't be so pleased when I pass this along to him. LOL

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  12. Good job Paul, not a glamour's job but a necessary one.

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  13. Another job well done ... will pass along to Mui for reference.

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  14. There must be worse RV jobs to do, I just cannot think of one at the moment. Glad it is behind you:)

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