Search This Blog

Friday, May 8, 2015

Window Repair Shop

I went on the tour of how Suncoast Designers repairs fogged windows.  A short, 15 minute tour, but interesting all the same.

First, the removed windows are brought into the shop and taken apart at a large, rug covered table.  One tech will do all the windows on each job, whether the RV has one window or fourteen.

               DSC06075 

Some windows have the glass “etched” by the moisture inside it and cannot be used, so the glass is placed in the discard pile.  Yep, both of my panes were in the pile.  It doesn’t take long for moisture to damage the glass, our window started fogging just about three months ago.  Rats!

               DSC06077 

The shop orders new glass to replace the damaged ones, they don’t make the glass here and because the glass is tempered, it has to be made to specific size.  Tempered glass cannot be cut.  Fortunately, they keep a large stock of standard size RV glass in stock, so having to order a pane isn’t too common. 

The next step is to run all the glass, both new and used, through a special washing and drying machine.

               DSC06078

The cleaned glass is then sent into a special, humidity controlled room, where both pieces of glass are assembled with a new seal.

               DSC06079

There are three sizes of seals used, depending on the RV window manufacturer.

                DSC06080

Once the new seal is placed in between the glass panes, the assembled window is sent to an oven/press to heat and permanently bond the panes together.

                DSC06081

After the glass has cooled, the new seal is in place.

                DSC06082

The finished window is placed in a rack awaiting reinstallation into the RV.

              DSC06083

Suncoast does not put any gases inside the windows, unlike some thermopane window manufacturers that do, they just leave low humidity air in the windows.  Their process must be good, because they warranty their window repairs for ten years.

Later, three techs came out to install my new window.  They carefully aligned, sealed and screwed it in place.

               DSC06085.JPG

Fifteen minutes later, it was done.  Now the sealant will cure overnight.  Tomorrow morning they are going to water test it and ensure there are no leaks.  Then we’ll hit the road (after I pay the bill) down the West coast to Key West.  Hope to be there in three or so days.  :c)

Update:  The window passed the water test, the techs cleaned it up so it’s spotless.  The bill for the repair:  $247.  I was expecting $300-$400, so I’m pleased.  Money saved for Key West!  :c)

Thanks for visiting and feel free to leave a comment.

                  license_20110706205528_24375[1][2][1]

16 comments:

  1. Sounds pretty cheap. I would have expected it to be more.

    Did they explain at all why the window failed to begin with?

    www.travelwithkevinandruth.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, most RV manufacturers use windows with cheap seals, to save money. Sort of long enough to get the RV out of the warranty period. We all know that RV manufacturers cut corners, this is one area. I was surprised that even high end RVs like Newells, American Eagles and Prevosts were there getting windows fixed, and none of those rigs were very old. In fact, just about every major brand was there. Sort of makes you wonder if dual pane windows are worth the cost if they cause expensive repair costs a few years down the road.

      Delete
  2. I'm with Kevin. That sounds pretty reasonable. If it's any consolation (and I know it isn't), Tiffin had a problem with fogging windows a few years back, as well. I know quite a few owners who had to have windows replaced.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I also thought it would be more expensive than that. Have to love it when the bill is less than expected - sure doesn't happen very often.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I would expect a new window to not cost much more if any... I bought 5 windows through Tiffin at cost and they were about 190 a piece...

    ReplyDelete
  5. I concur with Judith - interesting process. Thanks for the step by step "tour." I've never been to Key West, but I hear it's really fun!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Sure hope it's trouble free for 10 years. We may have to go that route for our back bedroom windows if we can't buy new ones. They are the ones that crank out so you can leave them open while it rains.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Glad Marti can see out again. What a process. Who knew there was so much involved in windows?

    ReplyDelete
  8. Well Alrighty... all your repairs are done!!! Marti can now see as you head to The Keys, one of our FAVORITE places:o))

    Safe Travels and have a blast...

    ReplyDelete
  9. I had foggy windows in my S&B, I guess dual pane windows can do that no matter where :) We opted out of dual pane when we bought Harvey. So far we're not disappointed with them.

    ReplyDelete
  10. The price of that repair bill sounded pretty cheap to me too. I'm glad everything is taken care of and you'll soon be in Key West. The vacation will continue.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Wow, they did an amazing job at replacing your windows. And you even got a quick tour on how their process work. The low cost afterwards was just icing to your RV cake. Anyway, I hope you’re all set, and that you did not have any further problems with your RV. Good day, and drive safe!

    Ross Adkins @ Bullseye Auto Glass

    ReplyDelete
  12. October 4, 2015
    hi Paul

    we called them last week and are on site tonight. Our drivers side window is starting the foggin and our table window (slider) has been fogged for quite a while. I rembered your post and when I realized we would be in the area I gave them a call. Driving in today I was impressed with their comment to the full time RV life style. Very well laid out and the number of sites for overnighting.

    George

    http://busterstravelsgeo-bon.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  13. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Nice article

    http://www.slideasydoors.com.au/

    ReplyDelete