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Thursday, September 26, 2013

Testing An LP Leak Detector

No, we have not blown up from a leak in our propane tank.  I know I have not posted in a few days but we’ve been enjoying shows here in Branson, MO.  Unlike Vegas, where everything that happens there stays there, in Branson you can tell everyone what you did here.  With a clear conscience.

Among the shows we’ve seen, we like the musical variety show best put on by the Hughes Brothers, five brothers, their wives and all thirty two of their children perform in a two hour long program.  We’ve seen their show five times now and never tire of “It”.

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But I digress.  The last post had us narrowly avoid tragedy (or having to buy a new motorhome) caused by a leaky propane fitting on the Journey’s propane tank.

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The interior of the Journey smelled of propane and we had to vent the inside to clear out the gas.  Thankfully, Marti’s nose picked up the smell because our LP detector did not sound.

The LP (propane) detector is mounted down next to the floor because propane is a heavy gas and sinks down.

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The green light on the unit indicates the detector is on and has power (12V) to it.  On some units there is a “Test” button to check if the unit is working.  Mine does not have it.

So how do you test it for proper operation?  Easy.

You use a butane lighter, click it on and hold the button down but not hard enough to light the flame.

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Put it near the detector and hold it there for a few seconds.  The detector should sound an alarm.

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My detector did not sound the alarm, even after repeated tests.  It is defective and will have to be replaced. 

I’m glad we found this out now, instead of in the middle of the night by waking up in mid air after the Journey blew up!  ;c)

Thanks for visiting and feel free to leave a comment.

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22 comments:

  1. Good thing that you did the test and will replace that faulty propane detector.

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  2. Good reminder to test the LP detector and check the propane fittings. We know our detector is working when one of the dogs is sleeping near it and passes gas!

    Glad you are taking time to have some fun in Branson, a place that is on our ever-growing "yet-to-to" list.

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  3. Good call testing that out!

    If you've gone to that show five times in a couple of days, you must have all the words memorized by now. ;)

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  4. Paul not sure if you are aware, but the original propane leak detector was made by CCI, which is out of business. I see you have a surface mount style, so it shouldn't be too hard to replace with a unit from a current-producing company. BTW, these things are supposed to be replaced after about 5 years anyway. (If that makes you feel any better.)

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  5. Glad to read that you two are enjoying some good times in Bransons!!

    Thanks for taking time to educate all of us. We just tested our LP detector as you demonstrated. IT WORK!!! Thanks for making sure we are safe:o))

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  6. We just replaced our detector last year because I didn't trust the one we had. Sure glad you found out that yours is defective without being in mid-air.

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  7. Glad you thought to test it. I had the same model in my Meridian 06. It never went off and I never thought to test it. Next time I pick up the Winnie View, you can be I am going to test it:)

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  8. All the shows sound like fun to me! Glad you figured out that leak and can fix it before you're thrown over into Kansas. We've had to replace our detector too.

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  9. Would you have woken up dead if the whole rig didn't explode? I don't know what would happen to people who breathe in propane.

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    1. I think I know what happens to people who breathe in propane. They die. They don't wake up dead or alive.

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  10. We ordered a Co2 and a LP detector today ours both test ok but are original from 2005 so to be on the safe side will be replaced.

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  11. Thanks for the tip on testing the gas detector. Sure beats using a match.

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  12. Wow! Usually those detectors are tooo sensitive. Good thing you checked it.

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  13. Yes, thanks for the tip. Ours doesn't have a test button either.

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  14. THIRTY TWO children? WOW! That means each family has 6+ children? That's a stage full. Sounds like you are having a good time, you certainly desrve it.

    You are a real public service to the RV community Paul. We're going to check ours thanks to you.

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    1. One of the brothers has 14(!!!) children. And all of them were in the show, even the little, newborn baby. :c)

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  15. I think it's a good idea for us to check ours too. It's not getting any younger...

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  16. Oh my - it's not good when your detector fails to detect...but at least you have an on-board LP detective who can sniff out the most nefarious odors.

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  17. We're so glad Marti has a sensitive sniffer.

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  18. good idea to test the propane detector. Ours has a green button, but who knows if that's working correctly.

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  19. the important thing with the detectors is to replace them every 5 years even if they still seem to be working...ours seem to be working but we are due so replaced them this week just to be on the safe side...we do use the ones with the test buttons...

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  20. Ours was the opposite, reacting to a of non-propane odors. Trash bags, floor cleaner, wax, etc. caused false positives. Even on a brand new replacement.

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